Toki’s Service Vest

A Service Vest is crucial to any Service Dog as it allows the public to understand that the dog is on duty and working. For Toki, her vest also indicates work-time much like a uniform to us. She knows when her vest is on that it is time to go out and assist me with my day.

Service vests come in many styles, colours and fabrics and it really is up to the handler to find one that is most suited for their service dog. I have noticed that a better quality vest is not questioned as much when in public as people seem to see them as “authentic”, which really there are no official vests for all service dogs.  Heavy duty and good quality vests seem to be the best option for many.  Better quality vests can be quite pricey and this is why I initially  had a blue hand-sewn vest for Toki. It was sewn by a friend and wasn’t the best quality and I was stopped a lot with Toki because her vest didn’t look “authentic“.  This is why I mention the service vest in this post, because society doesn’t seem to know that any vest will do. They do not come from a company or organization specific to my dog and training (although vests for some Service Dogs can come from organizations, they do not HAVE to). I have since updated Toki’s vest and have had very little questions about her vest now.

Toki’s current vest (pictured above) was made by The Raspberry Field and the quality is amazing. I chose the colour purple for her vest as it is the colour that represents my condition and it is one on my favourite colours too. Some people choose colours based on medical conditions and awareness but really it does not matter and does not necessarily define what the dog is used for. Really, the colour is up to the handler and what they prefer.

Patches are used to identify what the dog is used for and usually “Service Dog” or “Guide Dog” will do but I chose to be more specific as I get tired of explaining what “type” of Service Dog Toki is.  I think when people see PTSD, they don’t really want to ask further questions and I am comfortable with people knowing.

A common patch to see is the “DO NOT PET”, which is usually in the shape of a stop sign. The patch may also indicate not to staretalk to or distract the dog as they are working. Toki is not easily distracted so the no petting patch was good enough for us. I notice that even though this patch is large and red; some people do not see or completely ignore it. I have heard parents teach their kids about the stop sign patch and how it means to not pet my dog because it is working. I wish all people were educated on this and paid more attention to the vest than my cute dog. The stop sign does work in most cases and it does help identify that Toki is a working dog.

There are many options for service vests and what the handler decides to put on it is really up to them. Toki has her name embroidered on hers, a pin and some charms. Reflective tape helps in dark lighting for visibility. There are also two pockets sewn into her vest to carry her paperwork and other important things. Buckles hold up a lot better than Velcro and I know this from experience with Toki’s last vest. Heavy water resistant fabrics are better than light weight fabrics like cotton which absorb sweat, get smelly and dirty easily.

A service vest helps a dog doing a job and their handler too. It provides identification and allows the public to know the dog is working. As a handler you can chose any vest you wish and the options are really up to you. However, a vest does not mean a dog is a qualified Service Dog and paperwork from the handlers treating physician or forms from an accredited organization are needed*. Buying and putting a service vest on any dog is a crime and it also makes people with trained Service Dogs have a harder time in public. Remember a service vest is only for a working dog and not to let your non-working dog in a store with you. Service Dogs have years of training and are medical devices for their handler. Travelling in a wheelchair when you do not need one is the same as posing a non-Service Dog in a working vest.

*Check your local laws for what is needed for accessibility.

I would love to see more examples of other vests used by Service Dogs because there are so many options!

Toki’s old vest
Toki in her new vest

A Service Vest Helps Identify a Working Dog.

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2 thoughts on “Toki’s Service Vest

  1. ssgt leslie July 7, 2015 / 2:08 pm

    Great post. Thanks for sharing valuable information. We are protected under the DOJ ADA laws. By law a sd is not required to have a ‘uniform’. I think over time it has become an unspoken policy/requirement. Businesses ‘LOOK’ for it. Anyway keep doing positive things you and Toki.

    Like

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